Category Archives: Edible Garden

Wonderful world of colour……..In your vegetable garden

“Beauty is in the eye of the beholder” they say (in fact who did  first say that) but although we all love growing, and eating, vegetables can we really say they all look beautiful in our garden ?

Well I think most do, but if we have limited space, perhaps a town garden or just a raised bed or two, then wouldn’t it be great if we could combine growing vegetables with something nice to look at ?

Anyway I just thought a few ideas of particularly attractive vegetables, which could give you colour through a lot of the year, may be helpful.

(Just my ideas – sure you have lots of your own !)

How about starting with ‘Bright Lights’ Chard, really love this plant which can give quite vibrant colour from mid summer until quite late in the Autumn.

Bright Lights Chard

Now I know Broccoli is not everybody’s favourite, but an early sprouting purple broccoli can bring a bit of cheer to your veg. bed as early as March.

Early Purple Sprouting Broccoli

Sticking with the Broccoli family, you may even get the kid’s interested with the fascinating ‘Romanesco’

Romanesco broccoli

By seeding at different times, early Spring to July, you can get a crop through Summer to Autumn.

Allow a bit of room though, the plants can spread a bit !

I think the beautiful red flowers on Runner Beans are lovely, but unfortunately they are quite short lived before the beans come along.

runner bean

But how about if you could grow beans where the actual bean pods themselves gave some really interesting colour ?

For example here is the Borlotti Bean

Borlotti beans f

Again you can sow at different times to ensure colour from Summer to Autumn. You can  pick them as ‘Dwarf’ beans or let them grow up a bit.

I love the colours of Borlottis, but how about a bit of a contrast with the ‘Hildora’ Dwarf Bean ?

Dwarf Bean Hildora

This little bean, which keeps its colour after cooking, can be harvested from July onwards.

Some of the prettiest and daintiest vegetables are in the ‘Lettuce’ family ( huge family the ‘compositae’ even includes Sunflowers !)

Have a couple of real favourites though.

First the  gorgeous ‘Red Salad Bowl’ bringing your bed such vibrant colours.

lettuce-red-salad-bowl1-lg

But can you imagine a circle of these lovely plants being offset by some Lollo Rosso, perhaps in the middle ?

Lollo Rosso

You can keep seeding lettuces from February on to late summer, but they may need a bit of thinning.

Artichokes are another vegetable that doesn’t get everyone’s taste buds going – don’t care though, I love ’em !

The Violetta di Chioggia is a particularly beautiful plant.

Violetta di Chioggia Artichoke

Almost a shame to pick these, particularly as you only normally eat the base of the leaf.

They are perennials, but they may need some protection during the winter .

Ever tried fried Courgette flowers ? They are delicious !

Courgette flowers

Amazing crops you get from a Courgette plant too, for constant cropping you just need to keep picking. They will crop right up to late Autumn sometimes.

I like Borage in salads, and know people who also use it regularly in soups.

I also love its blue flowers.

(It’s used in both a traditional and modern medicine too, for a huge range of ailments!)

Borage

This is not an exhaustive list of wonderful looking looking vegetables, just a taster really (terrible pun.)

But I would like to finish on a real looker, but one perrenial you will need to keep under control.

The ‘Lardizabala’, which comes all the way from Chile.

(Like some of my favourite Sauvignon !)

Lardizabala

This is an evergreen climber – that can turn into a tree.

The soft, pulpy fruit is considered quite a delicacy in Chile and Peru, anybody tasted one ?

Don’t forget that you can add lots of colour to your vegetable garden with companion planting too.

Nasturtiums

Nasturtiums for example, lovely edible plants that can attract caterpillars and black fly away from your beans and lettuces.

Marigolds too are really bright and lovely, and their smell wards off the Aphids, but attracts the Hoverflies which feed on them (the greenfly that is !)

Double Whammy !

330px-African_Marigold

This is the Tagetes erecta – the African Marigold.

In fact companion planting is a fascinating subject, but one for another blog.

Edible Plants You Should Treat with a Little Caution

In my earlier blog I mentioned lots of lovely garden plants that can be eaten to make a really beautiful and edible garden.

Deliberately I left out a few that can be eaten but could in some way cause problems, but now I’m adding what I know about these plants in case I’m accused of ‘nannying’!

These ‘be careful’ plants come in all shapes, colours – and flavours.

Agastache anisata/foeniculum – I think these are really lovely ‘all rounders’. They not only look lovely, and have a beautiful delicate scent of aniseed, but bees, butterflies and lots of birds really, really love them.

Both flowers and leaves can be added to cakes, desserts, and yoghurts for a subtle flavour and fragrance of anise.

It really is best avoided though if you are pregnant  ( its a real shame that pregnant ladies  have to miss out on stuff so often !)

anise-hyssop-agastache-foeniculumAgastache

Begonia – but only the tuberhybrida, and only the petals. Delicate lemony taste, and the crispy texture is nice, but as they have a high content of oxalic acid so don’t make a pig of yourself ! (And if you have a tendency to gout, kidney stones or rheumatism then avoid altogether.)

Begonia_x_tuberhybrida_1005Pink1

Borage – Another lovely flower I think (although I am partial to blue flowers.) Mix the flowers into salads, fruit salads or drinks to add a cucumber taste, plus they really add to the look of any dish.

Again though, best avoided by pregnant ladies and mums who are lactating . They can also have a diuretic effect, so would suggest no more than 7 or 8 flowers at a ‘sitting’ !

Borage

Catmint – Nepeta cataria is another of my favourites (blue again you see) and its flowers have quite a strong flavour combining mintiness ( surprise) and spiciness.

Goes beautifully with lamb and can pep up vegetables and pasta dishes, but for pregnant women though, the ‘Nepeta’ is definitely best avoided.

Heb_Catmint

Daisy – You can play ‘Love Me – Love Me not’ as you pull the flowers apart to make a lovely petal garnish to all sorts of dishes from soups to salads. Not much flavour, although some people think they are bitter, and be careful if you a subject to allergies or hay fever.

They can trigger both.

Daisy

Daylily – Admit I do not grow these, they really are so short lived (‘Day Lily’ the clue is in the name !)

However, they really are versatile, almost like a vegetable. The early foliage (tasting a little like delicate onion when fried) later flowers and buds (raw or cooked adding sweetness) and even the rhizomes (nutty flavour) are edible – all are often found in Chinese cooking.  What’s to be cautious about then ?

Well nothing so long as you only consume Daylillies Hemerocallis , just hate anybody to think that all lillies (Lillium)are edible – they’re not, they are poisonous !

Striped_daylilies

Garland Chrysanthemum – coronnarium. There is nothing to be cautious about here either really. The strongly spiced flowers add  pep to salads, and ‘Japanese Chrysanthemum’ soup can be a real signature dish. But I just feel the same as I do about the Daylilly and Lillies in general, only ‘coronarium’ is safe – avoid all other Chrysanthemums.

Chrysanthemum - coronarium

Phlox – paniculata. Really beautiful fragrant flowers, with a spicy flavour that adds real pizzaz to fruit salads. (Some people crystallize them as they look so lovely decorating cakes and pastries.)  Nope nothing wrong at all with the perrenial paniculata, but do not confuse it with the annual creeping phlox (Phlox subulata) this is NOT edible, and this is the only reason it’s on my ‘caution’ list.

paniculata

Poppy – Papaver somniferum and paeoniflorum. Well all poppies are poisonous, and it is only the seeds from these two species that are edible, nothing else. I do love them though baked into, or sprinkled on the top, of bread (they always go everywhere when I’m cutting a slice though !)

Unless you know exactly which poppies are safe though, think they are best left in the garden.

Think every garden should have these cheerful plants though, do you know of any flower which is so poignant, evocative and beautiful ?

Papaver_somniferum_flowers

Hope this blog gives a few more ideas for your ‘Edible Garden’.

Treat cautiously and all of the above plants will really add to your environment, and your kitchen !