Tag Archives: environment

Getting Rid of Those Aphids

Have had loads of inquiries about how to deter Aphids without using chemicals.

Aphids
You could plant onions, garlic, coriander and french marigolds to put them off (incidentally they love Nasturtiums so perhaps planting these could attract them away – works to keep caterpillars off your cabbages too, but I always feel so sorry for the Nasturtiums! )

Nasturtiums
Before I suggest other stuff though, emphasise that I’m not trying to sell you anything it’s just that we do have various remedies because that is what we’re all about, using nature’s natural stuff to help solve problems.
Firstly there are bio controls  http://www.thenaturalgardener.co.uk/aphids.php these are mainly little wasps that get stuck in, they are only suitable for greenhouse application though, but they certainly won’t sting you !
Secondly we have had a lot of success with Neem Oil  http://www.thenaturalgardener.co.uk/pure-organic-neem-oil.p… this is quite thick though and you keep on having to shake the sprayer, coating the leaves and stems really helps ( though some people think it’s smelly.)
Then there is a solution made from boiling soap nut shells  http://www.thenaturalgardener.co.uk/soap_nuts.php, let it cool and spray all over.


We have heard of people digging in banana peel around plants, but a surest, most natural, method is getting lacewings, ladybirds and hoverflies into your garden and I have shown below just some plants that will attract them.

LadybirdlacewingHoverfly

(Always feel the Hoverfly gets a really hard time – whopped regularly because people think they are wasps!)

Achillea – ladybirds and lacewings

Alyssum – hoverflies

Alyssum – hoverflies
Angelica gigas – lace wings
Convolvulus minor – ladybirds and hoverflies
Cosmos bipinnatus – ladybirds and hoverflies
Daucus carota (Queen Anne’s lace)- ladybirds, lacewings and hoverflies

Queen Annes Lace
Filipendulina – Ladybirds and lacewings
Foeniculum vulgare (fennel) – ladybirds and lacewings
Iberis umbellate – hoverflies

Iberis
Limonium latifolium (Statice) – hoverflies
Lupin – hoverflies
Petroselinum crispum (parsley) – hoverflies
Tanacetum vulgare (tansy) – ladybirds and lacewings.
Tagetes tenuifolia Marigold – lemon gem – ladybirds and hoverflies (This plant deters Aphids by itself.) 

Lemon Gem

There are some weeds that are also ideal to attract these good guys – Dandelions for example – but maybe that’s going too far (but I leave an entire patch ‘cos bees like them too!)

Have a great season.

Help Wildlife In Your Garden this Winter (Then wildlife will help you in the Spring!)

It is estimated that there are over 15,000,000 gardens in the UK, can you just imagine how much we can contribute to wildlife (or destroy it!)

Us gardeners can transform the environment, can really help those bees and other pollinators so, so easily.
How ? With wildlife havens.
Cost ? An odd pallet,few piled logs,couple of sandbags, a natural patch – BIG money !

(The photo shows a real luxury hotel, but could give you a few ideas – although couple of logs mouldering away could be Shangri La for a lot of beasties !)

wildlife-trust-insect-hotel

We can just stick on another jumper or, to be honest, turn up the heating when the weather becomes really cold.

Beneficial insects and animals chilling out the winter months can’t, and many will not make it whatever we do.
But it’s so simple to offer a ‘home’, a haven, to at least help them survive. Survive and get busy in the Spring and Summer pollinating your garden ( or getting stuck into your slugs and aphids !) 

Bumblebees ( hibernating bees are always potential ‘Queens’) hedgehogs, butterflies*, toads, ladybirds …. just so many of beneficial animals which you will really appreciate in your garden.

So it’s definitely in your interest to make sure they do wake up !

Curb all that enthusiasm to cut back and make ‘tidy’ as well, what’s scruffy to you is a well ordered garden city to them.
(And don’t forget to moan at your council next year – we don’t want those verges cut!)

* Some of our favourite butterflies overwinter as adults: Peacocks, Tortoiseshells, Red Admirals and Brimstones for example, but many others try to hang in there as eggs, or even caterpillars.

Peacocksmall tortoiseshellred AdmiralBrimstone

Edible Plants You Should Treat with a Little Caution

In my earlier blog I mentioned lots of lovely garden plants that can be eaten to make a really beautiful and edible garden.

Deliberately I left out a few that can be eaten but could in some way cause problems, but now I’m adding what I know about these plants in case I’m accused of ‘nannying’!

These ‘be careful’ plants come in all shapes, colours – and flavours.

Agastache anisata/foeniculum – I think these are really lovely ‘all rounders’. They not only look lovely, and have a beautiful delicate scent of aniseed, but bees, butterflies and lots of birds really, really love them.

Both flowers and leaves can be added to cakes, desserts, and yoghurts for a subtle flavour and fragrance of anise.

It really is best avoided though if you are pregnant  ( its a real shame that pregnant ladies  have to miss out on stuff so often !)

anise-hyssop-agastache-foeniculumAgastache

Begonia – but only the tuberhybrida, and only the petals. Delicate lemony taste, and the crispy texture is nice, but as they have a high content of oxalic acid so don’t make a pig of yourself ! (And if you have a tendency to gout, kidney stones or rheumatism then avoid altogether.)

Begonia_x_tuberhybrida_1005Pink1

Borage – Another lovely flower I think (although I am partial to blue flowers.) Mix the flowers into salads, fruit salads or drinks to add a cucumber taste, plus they really add to the look of any dish.

Again though, best avoided by pregnant ladies and mums who are lactating . They can also have a diuretic effect, so would suggest no more than 7 or 8 flowers at a ‘sitting’ !

Borage

Catmint – Nepeta cataria is another of my favourites (blue again you see) and its flowers have quite a strong flavour combining mintiness ( surprise) and spiciness.

Goes beautifully with lamb and can pep up vegetables and pasta dishes, but for pregnant women though, the ‘Nepeta’ is definitely best avoided.

Heb_Catmint

Daisy – You can play ‘Love Me – Love Me not’ as you pull the flowers apart to make a lovely petal garnish to all sorts of dishes from soups to salads. Not much flavour, although some people think they are bitter, and be careful if you a subject to allergies or hay fever.

They can trigger both.

Daisy

Daylily – Admit I do not grow these, they really are so short lived (‘Day Lily’ the clue is in the name !)

However, they really are versatile, almost like a vegetable. The early foliage (tasting a little like delicate onion when fried) later flowers and buds (raw or cooked adding sweetness) and even the rhizomes (nutty flavour) are edible – all are often found in Chinese cooking.  What’s to be cautious about then ?

Well nothing so long as you only consume Daylillies Hemerocallis , just hate anybody to think that all lillies (Lillium)are edible – they’re not, they are poisonous !

Striped_daylilies

Garland Chrysanthemum – coronnarium. There is nothing to be cautious about here either really. The strongly spiced flowers add  pep to salads, and ‘Japanese Chrysanthemum’ soup can be a real signature dish. But I just feel the same as I do about the Daylilly and Lillies in general, only ‘coronarium’ is safe – avoid all other Chrysanthemums.

Chrysanthemum - coronarium

Phlox – paniculata. Really beautiful fragrant flowers, with a spicy flavour that adds real pizzaz to fruit salads. (Some people crystallize them as they look so lovely decorating cakes and pastries.)  Nope nothing wrong at all with the perrenial paniculata, but do not confuse it with the annual creeping phlox (Phlox subulata) this is NOT edible, and this is the only reason it’s on my ‘caution’ list.

paniculata

Poppy – Papaver somniferum and paeoniflorum. Well all poppies are poisonous, and it is only the seeds from these two species that are edible, nothing else. I do love them though baked into, or sprinkled on the top, of bread (they always go everywhere when I’m cutting a slice though !)

Unless you know exactly which poppies are safe though, think they are best left in the garden.

Think every garden should have these cheerful plants though, do you know of any flower which is so poignant, evocative and beautiful ?

Papaver_somniferum_flowers

Hope this blog gives a few more ideas for your ‘Edible Garden’.

Treat cautiously and all of the above plants will really add to your environment, and your kitchen !

 

Autumn Preparation for Clay and Heavy Soil

It’s the ideal time to prepare your clay soil before it gets too claggy and wet.

Digging away on a sunny Autumn day but thinking about the Spring to come I find is a wonderful pastime, but it can also reap benefits.

Digging in those essential nutrients, and then using the winter to breakdown the soil, will give your Spring planting a real initial boost (that’s not to say you can’t plant things now – but that’s another discussion.)

When I say ‘digging’ I’m not a great fan of deep digging, or double digging for that matter. You are probably preparing your veg. beds or raised beds and neither will require backbreaking work, let the coming frosts do that for you! Try and remove any remaining weeds (but I do have a cunning plan) but then dig in as much natural manure (it need not be fully rotted) as you can find plus your green compost. To give an extra boost I would be very tempted to dig in some organic soil improvers like seaweed granules http://bit.ly/nYipdT and some biochar http://bit.ly/KlvCYg ( but leave specific fertiliser and growing aids like wormcast extract http://bit.ly/1BQJxOC until you actually plant.)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Turn the  soil enough to give a spread to your natural additions, but again do not break your back by digging in too deeply, a fork is probably best for the task. (An old gardener once said to me “Dig for brassicas, and you’ll keep the green grocer happy” – nothing against green grocers mind!)

Just let nature take it’s course over the winter period, breaking down your soil and integrating all your organic help into its structure.

Remember though that nature is not really that fussy about which plants grow, and weeds are certainly very ‘successful’ plants which will probably arrive before you are ready to plant your vegetables so my cunning plan is why not cheat a bit? How about covering the soil you’ve prepared with a mulch you can easily clear away when ready, and will also improve the ground a little. It may be easier for me as I mainly grow in raised beds, but I apply a layer of straw and grass cuttings then cover with hessian to keep out the light and prevent new weeds both arriving and existing ones germinating (yep, they will be there!)

The winter storms will try and blow your cover and mulch around a bit, but I peg it down using any old thick, short sticks I can find.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Just before I finish loads of people have asked me about biochar. I was introduced to it by a lovely, young (she made me feel very old) Oxford Professor Cécile Girardin when we took part in the http://www.bigbiocharexperiment.co.uk/)

If you would like to know more about this ancient organic gardening aid take a look at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pNM4CNiSeKE where not just one but three Oxford professors explain it all.

biochar

Stop Those Leatherjackets & Scale Insects Now!

Daddy Long Legs climbed out of the ground and really started partying early this year.

It may be a charming little creature but the bumbling, clumsy Crane Fly’s but their larvae are called Leatherjackets and far from charming, these little critters will destroy your lawn. After all, Daddy Long Legs party hard but have yet to discover birth control!

If you’re a lawn lover then now is the best time to apply bio-controls to prevents these pests from desecrating your pride and joy. The window to do this is pretty small, and is only going to last for another couple of weeks. After that the ground will get too cold for the nematodes (nature’s natural bio control) to function. If you don’t do it now, your lawn could end up looking like this…

lawn

You could apply the nematodes in spring when the ground begins to warm up again but that’s also when the Leatherjackets will be getting into their stride. Their ‘jacket’ will also be pretty thick by then, so you will have to apply twice the amount of nematodes to ensure they’re effective.

You can see a bit more information on this underground situation here but we’re always happy to answer any questions if you contact us.

One more thing, loads of people are mentioning that scale insects are really prevalent this year. We don’t really know why, as they don’t get around much, but the problem with scales is that they seem pretty impervious to pesticides. They literally run straights off their backs.

Bio-controls really are the only answer, both a ‘lady bird’ Chilocorus nigritus and some specialist wasps are pretty effective (if your pesticide residue doesn’t knock them for six). There more information on this too here and here but again, if we can answer any questions just ask.

Now, get back to enjoying this lovely Autumn!

Sustainability or organic – which is more important ?

Most of us tend to choose organic, if the price differential isn’t too much !
But recently I’m beginning to wonder, what is more important, sustainability or organic certification ?

Leaving aside the debate as to the provenance of some approved organic treatments, copper sulphate for example, is the lack of an ‘organic’ tag putting us off sensible, sustainable practices ?

For example, we start all of our plants in a compost blend of wormcast and coir – full of good stuff and it’s nice and light. http://bit.ly/ipAEbW

We first experimented with this compost ( and then became totally hooked) when we found out these  worms are fed on waste paper collected from offices and organisations around Herefordshire ( where the worm farm is) plus farm manure, green waste and especially grown comfrey. An ideal way of recycling waste stuff, and fits perfectly with our objective of using ‘Nature’s Natural Cycle’

You cannot get organic waste paper though ! So what’s more important do you think ?

We also think that people need sustaining a bit to, that’s why our coir pots, produced from the waste husk of coconuts, are made for us by ladies in southern Sri Lanka. http://bit.ly/k8GGjI

It’s quite a cottage industry too, for the ladies of the area, to collect all of these waste husks but again can we be sure they are all organically grown ? (Although the ‘ Sri Lankan Coconut Development’ certifies they are.)

We have decided though that the benefits to the people of a poverty stricken area, the saving in the use of plastic and the returning of stuff back to the soil it came from ( that’s that ‘Nature’s Natural Cycle again)  outweighs the benefits of ‘organic’.

Most of what we sell though is, in fact, organic, everything from Neem fertiliser http://bit.ly/mvVNuF to Soap Nut Shells http://bit.ly/iJ98KQ ,but if we have to choose between sustainable practices or organic certification – we’re more and more coming down on the side of sustainability.